Simple Ways to Feed Yourself on a Camping Trip

When you feel the need to escape the urban jungle for a few days, a camping trip offers the perfect mix of adventure and relaxation to reduce those stress levels. The world of camping is pretty diverse, with something to suit all tastes, from the most basic (primitive) conditions for the hard core, back to nature, experience, through to recreational sites with more facilities.

Getting active is pretty easy on a camping trip, especially if you like hiking or water sports. For example, choosing to camp at specially designated sites in national forests makes it easy to enjoy nature and also to kayak on their rivers if you choose to.

Planning is the Key to Successful Camp Cooking

As there are unlikely to be any stores where you can buy or replenish provisions on site, and unless you plan to camp in an RV, there will be very limited cool storage or cooking facilities. This means planning what your party will be eating before you start the trip is pretty crucial.

Without the usual distractions and routines of regular life, and fueled by exercise which builds appetites, mealtimes become significantly more important when on an active short vacation. Camping doesn’t have to mean eating cold beans and junk food, though. With some thoughtful preparation and planning it’s entirely possible to produce simple meals and snacks which are tasty, mostly wholesome and above all, easy to fix.

Pack a Few Key Cooking Aids

Choosing a couple of versatile pots avoids weighing down your backpack with unnecessary equipment. Basically, with a pie iron, water pot and decent sized cooking pot (all scaled to suit the number of campers in your party), you are good to go. Add in a disposable BBQ and a Dutch oven if you have space left over. Japanese people often go camping simply to cook and eat outdoors, often producing mouth watering food in one pot.

Keep Recipes Simple

Ideally, it’s good to try out new dishes at home to make sure they are practical to prepare, safe to eat and actually taste good enough to bother. One pot meals are ideal, and can include curry, pasta, rice dishes and soups, but even the simplest recipe will probably turn out better than randomly adding any old thing to hot water! Look at sites such as easycampfirerecipes.com for inspiration.

Make Use of All Types of Food

While canned food is an obvious choice, you may never notice the variety of other convenient long life food your market sells. Dried soup mixes add flavor to lots of things, and pouches of heat treated food can often be eaten either hot or cold.

Soft fruits and vegetables don’t travel as well as firmer types, while their dried equivalents are the most versatile and easy to eat on the move. Lastly, don’t overlook powdered egg and milk, which are easy to carry, and useful to boost meals if you have a decent water supply.

So now you know that camping and simple, delicious food is a combination that can work really well, there’s no excuse for a backpack full of chips, candy bars and cookies!